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St Thomas More Catholic Secondary School

St Thomas More
Catholic Secondary School

Year 10 

Students need to know the basic theories and key terms taught in the first unit to help them understand the main units of study. Research methods must be taught early on as exam questions in both papers require students to apply their knowledge of primary and secondary sources to the sociology of the family, education etc. 

Content of the Year 10 course covers what they will be examined on in paper 1

Paper 1:

  • Sociological approaches and research methods
  • Families
  • Education

Following AQA guidelines which specify which units should be taught and in which order.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Introducing sociology

Research methods

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

The Family

 

20th April – 18th May

Education

 

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Research Methods.

The Family

24th Feb – 30th March

Education

 

1st June – 13th July

Consolidation of skills through revision  and exam questions

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

A deeper more accurate understanding of sociology will develop over time. Students will be able to include some key theorists and sociological vocabulary.

Students will show progression towards their target grades.

Employability skills:

  • Communication skills
  • Development of writing skills
  • Ability to analyse and evaluate information/statistics
  • Knowledge of government legislation which might be relevant in some careers.
  • Empathy and awareness of barriers to equality – again relevant in some careers.

 

Year 11 

Curriculum Intention:

Research project – to develop practical understanding of the research process and to support  the retrieval of information covered in the methods unit taught in year 10.

  • Crime and Deviance
  • Stratification
  • Exam practice and revision

Homework tasks will cover units already studied in Yr10 to aid with revision and retention of information in preparation for the external exams in May 2020.

The Year 10 /Year 11 curriculum provides students with a good foundation for those who wish to do A level Sociology.

The key skills imbedded in each unit will support a smooth transition to A level Sociology.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Research project

Crime and deviance

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Stratification

20th April – 18th May

Revision and exam practice

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Crime and deviance

Stratification

24th Feb – 30th March

Revision and exam practice

 

1st June – 13th July

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

  • Students will show a development of the key skills in their writing.
  • Essays will be structured well, showing clear evaluation.
  • Test results and exam question answers will show progression in their understanding of the skills/knowledge needed to do well.
  • Students will be able to refer to key sociologists and differentiate between the main theoretical perspectives and apply them to social issues accurately.
  • Students will acquire a wide sociological vocabulary which they will be able to use with precision.

Employability skills:

  • Acquire knowledge relevant for certain careers, example policing, social work, probation etc.
  • Communication skills
  • Development of writing skills
  • Ability to analyse and evaluate information
  • Knowledge of government legislation which might be relevant in some careers.
  • Empathy and awareness of barriers to equality – again relevant in some careers.

 

Year 12 

Curriculum Intention:

Introduction – main theories and key concepts are introduced.

  • Family unit taught alongside research methods
  • Education

The order allows the student to develop their understanding of the subject slowly.

Research methods needs to be taught before the education unit as exam questions require a knowledge of both.

The department follows the suggested order by the AQA exam board.

Families and Households

  • the relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies
  • changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing and the life course, including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and household structures
  • gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society
  • the nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society
  • demographic trends in the United Kingdom since 1900: birth rates, death rates, family size, life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation.

Research Methods

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design
  • sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics
  • the distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data
  • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research.

Education

  • The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure
  • differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society
  • relationships and processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil identities and subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning
  • the significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketization and privatisation, and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of and access to education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy.

This will provide students with the knowledge to make synoptic links in Yr. 2 of the course. The research methods will provide a good foundation for more complex ideas which will be discussed.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Introduction

Families and Households/research methods

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Education

20th April – 18th May

Revision in preparation for mock

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Families and Households/Research methods.

Begin Education

24th Feb – 30th March

Education

1st June – 13th July

Beliefs in society

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

  • Students will show a development of the key skills needed for the course in their writing and oral contributions.
  • Essays will be structured well, showing basic evaluation.
  • Test results and exam question answers will show progression in their understanding of the skills/knowledge needed to do well.
  • Student will be able to refer to key sociologists and differentiate between the main theoretical perspectives and apply them to a specific context accurately.
  • Students will acquire a wide sociological vocabulary which they will be able to use with precision.
  • A gradual improvement in essay and exam question answers.

Employability skills:

  • Communication skills
  • Ability to analyse and evaluate information.
  • Interpret charts/statistics.
  • Knowledge in certain areas of employment e.g. public sector jobs.  Law etc

 

Year 13 

Curriculum Intention:

Beliefs in Society

  • ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions
  • the relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations
  • religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice
  • the relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices
  • the significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, and globalisation and the spread of religions

Crime and Deviance

  • crime, deviance, social order and social control
  • the social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime
  • globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes
  • crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies.

Theory and Methods

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design
  • sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics
  • the distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data
  • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research
  • consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories
  • the concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory
  • the nature of science and the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific
  • the relationship between theory and methods
  • debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom
  • the relationship between Sociology and social policy.

The topics covered will support students who wish to pursue a social science degree at university.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Beliefs in Society

Family and deviance retrieval

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Theories and Methods

20th April – 18th May

Revision  and exam practice

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Crime and Deviance

(beliefs and family retrieval)

24th Feb – 30th March

Theories and Methods/Revision

1st June – 13th July

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Students will begin to show more accurate knowledge and understanding of sociology in their writing and include more rigorous evaluation.

Students will have a deeper awareness of the AO skills needed to do well. This should be reflected in their written work/test scores and oral contributions.

Employability skills:

  • Communication skills
  • Ability to analyse and evaluate information.
  • Interpret charts/statistics.
  • Knowledge in certain areas of employment e.g. public sector jobs.