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St Thomas More Catholic Secondary School

St Thomas More
Catholic Secondary School

 

Year 7 

Curriculum Intention:

As a Catholic School our RE curriculum is outlined by the Diocese. We align all of our schemes to the Catholic RE Curriculum Directory and a scheme called People of God (which the Northampton Diocese state they wish us to use). Following the guidelines of the Secondary Advisor for RE from NORES we have developed our own Curriculum plan for the whole of KS3 and link it to the Directory and People of God units. This brand new curriculum has been developed in 2019 and is for first teaching from September 2019. Our philosophy has to ensure progression, knowledge acquisition which will support GCSE, challenge and engagement. We will evaluate each of the units as we go through the year but we are hopeful that this will really stretch the students and encourage their enjoyment of our subject.

Firstly we have decided that across KS3 all units will be title with a learning question to inspire and challenge our learners.

  • Our first topic “how do we belong?” is based around a story of being stranded on an Island. The focus of the lessons is the importance of working as a community, belonging and developing roles and responsibilities. This is ideal for year 7 when they are new to our school community. Within this topic there is scope to bring in a really wide range of RE concepts such as sacraments, kingdom values etc. Everything will be studied in the context of the story and we are hoping it will really engage our learners as they are expected to imagine themselves on the journey.
  • Topic two is “Who inspires me?” which really builds on the idea of belonging by looking into their own life and sharing their own role models. This is then developed by looking at Catholic role models. This will then carefully link with the first topic as it explores how people of God live their lives. This is an opportunity for the pupils to learn about figures from the Old Testament and the challenges they faced. This is engaging as students focus on the stories and use these to learn.

Before Christmas we will also have some stand alone lessons on Advent.

  • Topic three is “Who is God?” once Year 7 have looked at belonging and inspiring people we then move onto focus on in more detail who is God? It is important that in year 7 we focus firstly on something that is less abstract and about them as the community and then move onto (with this topic) something that is more abstract. Within this topic they are going to start looking at:

-what can we know?

-what is revelation?

-what is trinity?

-who is God to me?

This will then be built upon in year 8 and 9. This also links to some topics that will be explored in much more depth at GCSE.

  • Topic four “what is love?” builds on from who is God by looking at one of the key characteristics of God. It looks at the ideas of different types of love. It then moves onto the idea of love that Jesus teaches in the NT. It starts to build in words such as covenant and agape.
  • Topic five “how does God show love for us?” is a development of ‘what is love’ and focuses more on God’s grace and his sharing of his love through the seven sacraments. Each lesson takes one of the seven sacraments and looks at its importance and how it demonstrates God’s love for his people. There will be links back to topic 1 where some sacraments have been looked at in the Island scheme. Here they will be studied in more detail. This also relates to GCSE as many students in the past have lacked basic knowledge of sacraments.
  • Topic six “Hinduism”. The Catholic schools curriculum directory and People of God scheme outline that every year at KS3 one unit must be on another world religion. We have decided to keep Hinduism for year 7 as students really enjoy the stark differences between Christianity. Also there are lots of opportunities to learn about stories and complete art work such as
    rangoli patterns.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

How do we belong?

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Who is God?

20th April – 18th May

How does God show love for us?

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Who Inspires me?

24th Feb – 30th March

What is love?

1st June – 13th July

Hinduism

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Our assessment overviews will demonstrate that there will be various ways to make knowledge stick. These will include retrieval quizzes, concrete examples, interleaving and spaced learning. For this reason the assessment for each topic will not always be at the end of each topic. In year 7 there will also be a real range of assessment methods. Each unit will be assessed and these will go towards the tracking point. In year 7 assessments will include opportunities for students to show their knowledge (A01) but also start to develop their skills of evaluation (A02). There will be lots of support and guidance given to year 7 to develop their evaluation skills and extended writing. This is where there are clear links with history and English because the skills that we are teaching and developing are valuable to all these subjects. Homework will also be a range of tasks including research, questions to answer and tasks to complete (including creative tasks).

Progress will be seen via the development of their AO2 skills alongside a knowledge of each topic. At this stage it will be integral for GCSE and beyond that we start to develop these skills that they will require later on. Over the coming year we will start to build in retrieval tasks to KS3 for the knowledge that we would like students to retain into GCSE.

Employability skills:

This course is essential to developing a sense of personal belonging to a community. It will encourage everyone in the class to consider their wider role and the responsibilities they have. There will be a strong spiritual element to this course which will help them think about their own faith. It will develop respect for others and understanding of different peoples’ views.

Also analysis and evaluation skills will be important and developed verbally and in the written form.

Year 8 

Curriculum Intention:

This course really builds on from the year 7 scheme. In year 7 there was an overview of many religious education topics. Parts of these are now chosen and taught in more detail eg. In year 7 the scheme looked at who inspires me, year 8 focuses on the promises some inspirational people made with God. The details that we have chosen for year 8 have been chosen as they link closely with the content from year 7 and also prepare them for GCSE by starting to look at content they will need here.

Topic 1 “Why do promises matter?” This will build on year 7 inspirational people and what is love. It will look at vocabulary such as covenant which they need for GCSE. It will also explore the lives of certain Patriarchs who they need to know for Judaism GCSE topics.

Topic 2 “Why are humans special?” We really wanted to include this topic for interest and engagement. It is certainly very topical in our world at the moment, but also gives us the opportunity to start concepts they need for GCSE such as imago dei.

Topic 3 “Are there limits to forgiveness?” This builds on the idea of God’s love from year 7. Forgiveness is also a topic that is covered at GCSE in more depth. This encourages us to develop knowledge of vocabulary needed.

Topic 4 “Why do we celebrate?” This builds brilliantly on from year 7 study of sacraments where there was one lesson on the Eucharist. Now there will be a whole series of lessons on the Eucharist. We have found that at GCSE students lack basic knowledge of this area of the curriculum and this will ensure they are supported here.

Topic 5 “What stories are important to me?” This unit builds on the ideas of What is love in year 7 which touched on Jesus’ idea of love. Now there is much more detail about the stories he teaches (parables).

Topic 6: Islam. This unit develops our students’ knowledge and understanding of world religions and the faith and beliefs of people within in our own school and wider community.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Why do promises matter?

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Are there limits to forgiveness?

20th April – 18th May

What stories are important to me?

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Why are humans special?

24th Feb – 30th March

Why do we celebrate?

1st June – 13th July

Islam

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Assessment in year 8 will build on year 7 because there will be less structure and support given to students but they will be expected to include more evaluation into their long answers. Where possible assessments will start to take more of the form of GCSE where there will be a mix of short answers and a longer answer. Here there will be more focus on trying to develop the technique needed for question 5’s which are worth 12 marks.

Homework and cross curricular as above.

Progress will be seen via the development of their AO2 skills alongside a knowledge of each topic. At this stage it will be integral for GCSE and beyond that we start to develop these skills that they will require later on. Over the coming year we will start to build in retrieval tasks to KS3 for the knowledge that we would like students to retain into GCSE.

Employability skills:

Students will develop a greater awareness of their own and others importance. SMSC topics which look at their own lives and values will be encouraged.

Also analysis and evaluation skills will be important and developed verbally and in the written form.

Year 9 

Curriculum Intention:

One of our main focuses of year 9 is that alongside wanting to prepare them for GCSE we are determined to ensure that RE lessons are still engaging, challenging and thought provoking.

Topic 1 “What is church?” This unit has really close links to GCSE as much of the concepts here will be needed for the GCSE course. The focus of this is just to build on year 7 and 8 by focusing on the role and importance of the Catholic Church.

Topic 2 “How is faith put into action?” Year 7 and 8 focused on the faith; here this is developed by ensuring students know the practical implications of faith. Many of the topics covered will also link to GCSE, such as vocation and CAFOD.

Topic 3 “Why is justice important in crime and punishment?” Once again this is moving on from year 7 and 8 by placing religious topics into our real world. How do religious beliefs impact our society? Justice is also something that is covered at GCSE.

Topic 4 “ What are miracles?” This topic is meant to build on Jesus’ love in year 7, Jesus’ parables in year 8 and now focuses on Jesus’ work. This also helps with evidence for GCSE.

Topic 5 “What do Jews believe and practice?” This is an introductory series of lessons on Judaism which sets them up for GCSE.

Topic 6 “Where do we come from?” This is the first unit of the GCSE course “CREATION” and acts as bridge into the GCSE course,

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

What is the church?

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Why is justice important in crime and punishment?

20th April – 18th May

 What do Jews believe and practice?

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

How is faith put into action?

24th Feb – 30th March

What are miracles?

1st June – 13th July

Where do we come from?

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

The assessments for year 9 will start to take the form of GCSE assessments. This builds on year 7 and 8 where they have been starting to develop the skills. This also starts to familiarise students with the structure of the actual GCSE.

Employability skills:

This course really shows the value of religious education in our world and society.

Also analysis and evaluation skills will be important and developed verbally and in the written form.

Year 10 

Curriculum Intention:

The GCSE course is mandated by the diocese. Whilst there is some flexibility in terms of which exam board we use, in essence the topics are exactly the same as each exam board has to include what, ultimately, the Bishops of England Wales have set out, which ultimately comes from the Vatican. The course is taught chronologically from Creation [beginning of the world] through to Eschatology [end of the time and life after death– this is deliberate as you cannot have an understanding of some of the topics without having studied previous topics.

An understanding of Catholic doctrine will then help students apply this to the themes that they study in year 11, particularly arming students with the theology to be able to justify Christian and Catholic responses to particular ethical issues. It is also important for when they study Judaism as they need to be able to compare Jewish beliefs with the main religious tradition of the U.K. Students, therefore, need an understanding of the beliefs of the main religious tradition of Great Britain before they can compare it with Judaism

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Creation

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Finish Trinity

Begin Redemption

20th April – 18th May

Finish Church and Kingdom of God

Begin Eschatology

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Incarnation

Trinity

24th Feb – 30th March

Finish redemption

Begin Church and the Kingdom of God

1st June – 13th July

Finish off Eschatology

Begin Judaism beliefs

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

What will student outcomes look like? 

How will you know students are making progress?

Catholic Christianity Component:

This component covers the content laid down by DfE for study of religions: Catholic Christianity: (i) beliefs and teachings; (ii) practices; (iii) sources of wisdom and authority, and (iv) forms of expression. These four areas are examined throughout each of the six units of study in the Catholic Christianity component so that by the end of the course students are able to know and understand  key Catholic beliefs and teachings in that particular unit, how these beliefs and teachings are practiced,  where the authority comes from for these beliefs and teachings and how such beliefs are expressed through art, statues, architecture, for example

Catholic Christianity is studied in the context of Christianity as a whole, and common and divergent views within Catholic Christianity and, where relevant, Christianity as a whole, is  included throughout. Students should be aware of the influence of Catholic Christianity on individuals, communities and societies.

Topic 1 Creation

Students will have knowledge and understanding of: the Catholic understanding of creation, particularly the notions of God as creator, humanity as the image of God and the role of humanity as stewards of creation. Students will have knowledge and understanding of the basis for these beliefs in scripture and their expression both in the visual arts and in the increasing agency of the Church in tackling global concerns about the environment, as well as different Christian understandings of the account of creation in Genesis 1 and 2 and the Catholic understanding of the harmony between science and religion.

Topic 2 Incarnation

Students will have knowledge and understanding of the Catholic understanding of incarnation as the revelation of God in the image of humanity. Students will have knowledge and understanding of the significance of the example and teaching of Jesus as the authoritative source for moral teaching is considered, alongside the importance of the sacramental nature of reality and expressions of beliefs about Jesus in symbol and statuary. This leads to an examination of different Christian views about images of Jesus.

Topic 3 Trinity

Students will have knowledge and understanding of the Catholic understanding of the glory of God and the mystery of the Trinity. Expressions of this belief in music, scripture and tradition are explored along with the authority and influence of the magisterium and the practice of prayer and students will have secure knowledge and understanding of these issues. 

Topic 4 Redemption

Students will have knowledge and understanding the Paschal mystery of salvation as it is understood in Catholic theology and as it is celebrated and realised in Catholic worship, as well as the Church as the ‘Body of Christ’ and a redeemed ‘People of God’. They will know and understand the different metaphors used to express the mystery of salvation and the shape, contents and meaning of Church buildings and decoration ‒ specifically those parts of a Church which speak directly about the mystery of salvation as celebrated and made present in the sacrament of the Eucharist. Students will have knowledge and understanding of how redemption is a common theme within Catholic Christianity, and know and understand the approach of thinkers such as Irenaeus and Anselm and how they emphasise different aspects of the tradition.

Topic 5 Church and the Kingdom of God

Students will have knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Church and its mission to bring about the Kingdom of God as expressed in the Lord’s Prayer. They will have knowledge and understanding of the Catholic understanding of the Church as the pilgrim people of God is explored through the study of dramatised prayer and pilgrimage and the meaning of mission through vocation and service.

Topic 6 Eschatology

Students will have knowledge and understanding of what Catholics believe about life after death and the implications of these beliefs for how Catholics live their lives today.

This includes an exploration of the Paschal candle as an expression of the risen Christ and Michelangelo’s Last Judgement, as well as beliefs about life after death, the funeral rites and the implications of beliefs about life and death for Catholic views about euthanasia.

Although the material is set out in separate sections, all parts of the content are linked and students will be able to draw ideas together in any way they wish in response to the set questions.

Progress will be measured through formal TP and also through the use of examination questions interweaved into the lessons

Employability skills:

Critical analysis and ability to persuade others through debate

Conflict-solving through Theme B Peace and Conflict

Skills of evaluation

Communication: both written and verbal

Team-work

Promoting British values: mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths with the learning of Judaism

Year 11 

Curriculum Intention:

Year 11 introduces perspectives of faiths – themes (Marriage, relationships and the family and Peace and Conflict, followed by two units of another religion, Judaism. We are mandated by the diocese to teach Judaism. We teach four units in year 11 to allow further time for revision and retrieval practice. Another reason for this choice, is that students have to be able to justify Catholic responses, with reference to Catholic teaching and doctrine, without having this foundation built in year 10, they simply wouldn’t be able to do this.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Jewish beliefs – finishing off

Jewish practices

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Theme A Marriage and the Family

Beg Theme B Peace and Conflict

20th April – 18th May

Revision

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Mock preparation

24th Feb – 30th March

Finish off Theme B Peace and Conflict

Course end

Revision

1st June – 13th July

 

 

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

In Section A of this component, students should study either Islam or Judaism, with a focus on the beliefs, teachings and practices of the religion studied. In year 11, students study Judaism.

In Section B students should study either two religious, philosophical and ethical studies themes (chosen from Themes A–C) or both textual studies themes (Themes D–E). Our students study Theme A and B from religious, philosophical and ethical themes.

Students should study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Judaism specified below and their basis in Jewish sources of wisdom and authority. They should be able to refer to scripture and/or sacred texts where appropriate. Some texts are prescribed for study in the content set out below and questions may be set on them. Students may refer to any relevant text in their answers and AQA will publish a list of appropriate texts as part of the supporting material for this specification. These additional texts will not be required for study, alternatives may be used, and questions will not be set on them.

Students should study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies.

Students will know and understand the common and divergent views within Judaism in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed. Students will be able to refer to a range of different Jewish perspectives in their answers, for example, Orthodox, Reform and Liberal Judaism.

Students will know and understand that Judaism is one of the religious traditions in Great Britain today, that religions and beliefs in Great Britain are diverse and include Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism as well as other religious and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism, and that the religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian.

Students will be able to identify and explain two teachings common to Christianity and Judaism:

  • Monotheism.
  • God as Creator.

Students will be able to identify beliefs about the Messiah as a topic on which the teachings of Judaism and Christianity differ and will be able to explain the different perspectives on that topic.

Students must study two of the religious, philosophical and ethical themes (Themes A–C) or the two textual studies themes (Themes D–E). Students who choose Themes A–C should study Christian and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism in contemporary British society.

Students will have knowledge and understanding of Christian and philosophical and ethical arguments and their impact and influence on the modern world.

Students will be able to show their understanding of religion through the application of teachings from religion and beliefs. They will also be able to make specific references to sources of wisdom and authority including scripture or other religious texts. 

Theme A students will have knowledge and understanding of:

Relationships and the human condition – love and sexuality: communion and complementarity
Perspectives on relationships – marriage, cohabitation, divorce and separation
Families and responsibilities – roles of men, women and children within the family
Gender, equality and discrimination – equality of women and men

For all of the above students will be able to make contrasts or links

And have an awareness of different perspectives, Christian and non-religious (such as atheist or humanist) in contemporary British society on these issues

Theme B Students will have knowledge and understanding of:

Christian perspectives on human violence, justice, forgiveness and reconciliation
Christian perspectives on societal war and just war
Holy war and pacifism
Christian perspectives on terrorism and Christian initiatives in conflict resolution and peace making

Students will know and understand the different perspectives, Christian and non-religious (such as atheist or humanist) in contemporary British society on these issues. 

Employability skills:

Critical analysis and ability to persuade others through debate

Conflict-solving through Theme B Peace and Conflict

Skills of evaluation

Communication: both written and verbal

Team-work

Promoting British values: mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths with the learning of Judaism

Year 12
 

Curriculum Intention:

In year 12 we cover the Edexcel Religious Studies A level. There are three components to the course. Philosophy, Ethics and New Testament. We have chosen New Testament over Christianity because traditionally as a school we have always taught New Testament. It plays to the strengths of the teachers as all three of us teaching A level prefer and feel more confident with New Testament compared to the other disciplines. Finally although students tend to succeed in this area of study.

From the start of year 12 we teach all three of these units. The students have three lessons per fortnight in these areas. They also have a different teacher for each area.

We follow the specification from the exam board and cover all the topics methodically, whilst teaching exam skills (essay writing) alongside the topics.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Philosophy: Philosophical Issues and questions

NT: Social historical and religious context of the NT

Ethics: A study of three ethical theories

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Philosophy: The nature and influence of religious experience

NT : texts and interpretations of Jesus

Ethics: Significant concepts in issues or debates in religion and ethics

20th April – 18th May

Philosophy: Problems of evil and suffering

NT: Interpreting text and issues of relationship, purpose and authorship.

Ethics: Application of ethical theories to issues of importance

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Philosophy: Philosophical Issues and questions

NT: Social historical and religious context of the NT

Ethics: A study of three ethical theories

24th Feb – 30th March

Philosophy: The nature and influence of religious experience/ Problems of Evil and suffering

NT : texts and interpretations of Jesus

Ethics: Significant concepts in issues or debates in religion and ethics

1st June – 13th July

Philosophy: Religious Language

NT: Interpreting text and issues of relationship, purpose and authorship.

Ethics: Application of ethical theories to issues of importance

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Students will develop knowledge of the three areas of the course. In a range of assessment tasks they will be asked to demonstrate A01 (knowledge) or A01 and A02 (evaluation). Students will confidently be able to share this knowledge and evaluate each area of the course in the written form.

Students are all given essay books where they must write their essays in and receive feedback. These are an excellent record of progress.

Employability skills:

Skills that will be fostered will include evaluation, analysis, critique of information.

Year 13 

Curriculum Intention:

In year 13 we cover the Edexcel Religious Studies A level. There are three components to the course. Philosophy, Ethics and New Testament. We have chosen New Testament over Christianity because traditionally as a school we have always taught New Testament. It plays to the strengths of the teachers as all three of us teaching A level prefer and feel more confident with New Testament compared to the other disciplines.

From the start of year 13 we teach all three of these units. The students have three lessons per fortnight in these areas. They also have a different teacher for each area.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Philosophy- Influences and developments in religious belief

Ethics-Ethical language

NT: Ways of Interpreting Scripture

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Philosophy: Works of scholars

Ethics- Deontology,virtue ethics and the works of scholars

NT: Text and interpretation: the kingdom of God, conflict and the death and resurrection of Jesus

20th April – 18th May

REVISION

 

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Philosophy- Influences and developments in religious belief

Ethics- Deontology,virtue ethics and the works of scholars

NT: Text and interpretation: the kingdom of God, conflict and the death and resurrection of Jesus

24th Feb – 30th March

Philosophy: Works of Scholars

Ethics- Medical ethics: beginning and end of life issues

NT: Scientific and historical-critical challenges, ethical living and the works of scholars

1st June – 13th July

 

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Students will develop knowledge of the three areas of the course. In a range of assessment tasks they will be asked to demonstrate A01 (knowledge) or A01 and A02 (evaluation). Students will confidently be able to share this knowledge and evaluate each area of the course in the written form.

Students are all given essay books where they must write their essays in and receive feedback. These are an excellent record of progress.

Employability skills:

Skills that will be fostered will include evaluation, analysis, critique of information.