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St Thomas More Catholic Secondary School

St Thomas More
Catholic Secondary School

Year 7 

Curriculum Intention:

To know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day.

Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’.

Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously, including making inferences and understanding usefulness of sources and how sources are interpreted.

Understand historical concepts such as change and continuity, cause .

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

What is history?

Unit 2 Norman conquest

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Unit 3 Barons Revolt

20th April – 18th May

Unit 5 War of the Roses

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Norman conquest

24th Feb – 30th March

Unit 4

1st June – 13th July

Unit 6 Bedford Castle

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Pupils’ progress in year 7 will be assessed and reported as either Exceeding (EXC), Expected (EXP), or Working Towards (WTS) against success criteria that have been set for specific tasks carried out in class. The tasks that are assessed cover key strands from the course including both knowledge of the history and ability in using historical methods.

Assessment of work will be carried out regularly by either peer or teacher and their progress reported once a term as either Exceeding (EXC), Expected (EXP), or Working Towards (WTS).  Clear guidelines on how to improve their work is given with dedicated time given to improve their work and attempt challenge tasks.

In the summer term, an End of Year Tracking test will be completed and will represent the opportunity for a detailed assessment on pupil’s ability to apply knowledge.

Employability skills:

Having an historical understanding that events in the past have causes and consequences.  Applying that analysis to other events.

Understanding criteria for significance, can be applied to other people and events.

Year 8 

Curriculum Intention:

To know and understand  the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day.

Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘monarchy’ ‘empire’.

Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously, including making inferences and understanding usefulness of sources and how sources are interpreted.

Understand historical concepts such as change and continuity, cause, significance,  .

Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Unit 1 Enquiry Skills

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Unit 4 English Civil War

20th April – 18th May

Unit 6 Slave Trade

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Unit 2 Henry VIII

24th Feb – 30th March

Unit 5 French Revolution

1st June – 13th July

Unit 7 local history

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Pupils’ progress in year 8 will be assessed and reported as either Exceeding (EXC), Expected (EXP), or Working Towards (WTS) against success criteria that have been set for specific tasks carried out in class. The tasks that are assessed cover key strands from the course including both knowledge of the history and ability in using historical methods.

Assessment of work will be carried out regularly by either peer or teacher and their progress reported once a term as either Exceeding (EXC), Expected (EXP), or Working Towards (WTS).  Clear guidelines on how to improve their work is given with dedicated time given to improve their work and attempt challenge tasks.

In the summer term, an End of Year Tracking test will be completed and will represent the opportunity for a detailed assessment on pupil’s ability to apply knowledge.

Employability skills:

Having an historical understanding that events in the past have causes and consequences.  Applying that analysis to other events.

Understanding criteria for significance, can be applied to other people and events.

Being able to write about developed concepts in a structured way.

Year 9 

Curriculum Intention:

To know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day.

Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘monarchy’ ‘empire’.

Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously, including making inferences and understanding usefulness of sources and how sources are interpreted.

Understand historical concepts such as change and continuity, cause, significance.

Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history.

Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Unit 1 Research and Independent learning

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

World War one

20th April – 18th May

Holocaust

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Historic Environment Unit

24th Feb – 30th March

Unit 4 Lead to World War Two

1st June – 13th July

John Howard

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Pupils’ progress in year 9 will be assessed and reported as either Exceeding (EXC), Expected (EXP), or Working Towards (WTS) against success criteria that have been set for specific tasks carried out in class. The tasks that are assessed cover key strands from the course including both knowledge of the history and ability in using historical methods.

Assessment of work will be carried out regularly by either peer or teacher and their progress reported once a term as either Exceeding (EXC), Expected (EXP), or Working Towards (WTS).  Clear guidelines on how to improve their work is given with dedicated time given to improve their work and attempt challenge tasks.

In the summer term, an End of Year Tracking test will be completed and will represent the opportunity for a detailed assessment on pupil’s ability to apply knowledge.

Employability skills:

Having an historical understanding that events in the past have causes and consequences.  Applying that analysis to other events.

Understanding criteria for significance, can be applied to other people and events. 

Source analysis for Utility very useful in a range of contexts to detect ‘fake news’ and outright lies.

Being able to write about developed concepts in a structured way.

Year 10 

Curriculum Intention:

Crime and Punishment in Britain c1000- present

  • In studying the content defined below in strands 1 and 2, students should understand how key features in the development of crime and punishment were linked with the key features of society in Britain in the periods studied.
  • They should develop an understanding of the nature and process of change. This will involve understanding patterns of change, trends and turning points, and the influence of factors inhibiting or encouraging change within periods and across the theme. The key factors are: attitudes in society; individuals and institutions (Church and government); and science and technology.
  • They should also understand how factors worked together to bring about particular developments at particular times.
  • The selected case studies in strand 3 of each period exemplify, in context, the elements defined in strands 1 and 2. They provide opportunities to explore the operation of the key factors and to make detailed comparisons over time.

British depth studies (Anglo-Saxon and Norman England) The depth studies focus on a substantial and coherent short time span and require students to understand the complexity of a society or historical situation and the interplay of different aspects within it. Depending on the depth study chosen, these may include social, economic, political, religious and military aspects. The content is divided into three key topics. These provide a framework for teaching and understanding the option, but should not be taken in isolation from each other. For each depth study, there is some chronological overlap between key topics – this structure helps highlight the complexity and interplay of different aspects within society.

Period studies (The American West) The period studies focus on a substantial and coherent medium time span of at least 50 years and require students to understand the unfolding narrative of substantial developments and issues associated with the period. The content is divided into three key topics, which provide a framework for teaching and understanding the option. These run in chronological sequence, but should not be taken in isolation from each other – students should appreciate the narrative connections that run across the key topics

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Crime from 1000 AD

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Case studies

20th April – 18th May

American West

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Punishment over the period

24th Feb – 30th March

Anglo Saxons

1st June – 13th July

American West

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Students will be assessed on their knowledge and understanding, with questions focusing on similarity and difference, and change and continuity. This may include turning points (significance), extent of, and causes or consequences of change.

The content is assessed through a question on features of the period and also through a historical enquiry. For the historical enquiry, students will need to develop the skills necessary to analyse, evaluate and use contemporary sources to make substantiated judgements, in the context of the historical events studied. To aid teaching, the content is divided into two sections: the first covers the site in its historical context; the second covers knowledge, selection and use of sources relevant to this historic environment for enquiries.

Students will be assessed on their knowledge and understanding. Questions will target key features and causation, and may also target other second order concepts (change, continuity, consequence, similarity, difference, significance). 

 Students will be assessed on their knowledge and understanding. Questions will target: consequence; significance (of specified events in relation to situations and unfolding developments); and analytical narrative (requiring students not only to describe what happened, but also to analyse events to find connections that explain the way in which events unfolded).

Employability skills:

Understanding guidance and writing to a specification.

Source skills analysis applicable to a range of contexts.

Data collection and understanding of detail, translating that into coherent response to a question (why can’t most politicians do this?)                                         

Know how to structure and write specifically about cause, consequence, identify and write about change and continuity, relevant to a range of jobs and careers that require data analysis.

Year 11 

Curriculum Intention:

The depth studies focus on a substantial and coherent short time span and require students to understand the complexity of a society or historical situation and the interplay of different aspects within it. Depending on the depth study chosen, these may include social, economic, political, cultural and military aspects. The main content is divided into four key topics. These provide a framework for teaching and understanding the option, but should not be taken in isolation from each other. For each depth study, there is some chronological overlap between key topics – this structure helps highlight the complexity and interplay of different aspects within society.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

USA Conflict at Home and Abroad

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Revision

20th April – 18th May

Revision

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Anglo Saxons

24th Feb – 30th March

Revision

1st June – 13th July

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Students will be assessed on all four Assessment Objectives. All questions may relate to any content specified in the four key topics. Questions focusing solely on knowledge and understanding will target causation. Other questions will target the ability to analyse and evaluate contemporary sources and later interpretations. Students should be aware that interpretations are based on evidence from their period of study. They should be aware of a range of evidence that can be used to reach conclusions. They should study examples of such evidence and consider ways in which it could give rise to and support different interpretations. Students should understand a range of reasons why interpretations may differ. They should be aware that differences based on conclusions drawn from evidence are legitimate and can be explained. They should be able to evaluate given interpretations using their own knowledge of the period.

Employability skills:

Refining memory techniques.  To write a response, from memory under pressure.

Source skills analysis applicable to a range of contexts.

Data collection and understanding of detail, translating that into coherent response to a question.

Know how to structure and write specifically about cause, consequence, identify and write about change and continuity, relevant to a range of jobs and careers that require data analysis.

Year 12 

Curriculum Intention:

The Early Tudors

The Period Study element of the unit is assessed by essays, which will allow learners to develop their use and understanding of historical terms, concepts and skills. The length of the periods studied will encourage learners to develop their interest in, and understanding of, important developments. The topics available in the units in this group will enable learners to ask significant questions about important issues. They are sufficiently broad and balanced to ensure both coherence and variety and have sufficient chronological range to provide for the study of continuity and change, which allows analysis of causes and consequences within the periods. The addition of the Enquiry element to either the beginning or end of the period will ensure that learners do not have a borehole approach to their study, but will be able to see change and developments, and make substantiated judgements, over a substantial length of time, so that they can see issues in a wider perspective. The Enquiry topic areas include the study of significant individuals, societies, events and issues. They also include a range of different historical perspectives, for example aesthetic, cultural, economic, ethnic, political, religious, scientific, social and technological.

Democracy and Dictatorships in Germany

This course develops further the second order concepts from GCSE such as cause, consequence and significance of key events and individuals. This unit is taught across the 2 years so that knowledge is not forgotten in Year 13 and it also compliments Unit 3 Russia and its Rulers Unit as both histories are inter-linked. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the key historical terms and concepts relevant ro Germany 1919-63. The will require learners to recall, select and deploy appropriate knowledge and communicate this clearly and effectively. Students will be expected to demonstrate abilities to explain, assess, analyse and consider the relationships between key features of the period studied in order to reach substantiated judgements which will prepare them for the world of work and or university. They will also be enabled to ask significant questions about important issues. Stereotypes will be challenged and resources and teaching strategies will reflect and value the diversity of experiences and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of people and communities beyond their immediate experience.

Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964

This unit is taught across the 2 years so that knowledge and skills are firmly embedded by the end of the 2 years and has been chosen as it complements the Germany Unit 2 option. This course brings together all the skills that have been taught and developed across KS3 and 4 as students will use their skills of analysis to move onto the higher order skill of synthesis and testing a hypothesis and evaluation of secondary interpretations. Stereotypes will be challenged and resources and teaching strategies will reflect and value the diversity of experiences and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of people and communities beyond their immediate experience.

Independent Study

The NEA is completed ideally by the end of Year 12 so as to allow Year 13 to focus on the 3 examined units and prepare for the final exams. This unit builds on the skills being taught across the other 3 examined units and allows the students to showcase their ability to work independently which is valuable preparation for university. Students can immerse themselves in a chosen topic and be exposed to other types of history and civilisations other than those already studied. They will produce a 3,000 to 4,000 word essay.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Independent Study

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Independent Study

20th April – 18th May

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Independent Study

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Independent Study

24th Feb – 30th March

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Independent Study

1st June – 13th July

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Independent Study

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

NEA Complete by summer of Year 12 which is a focussed answer and will be supported by detailed and accurate knowledge. Primary sources and secondary interpretations will be analysed and evaluated and used to support the judgements being made.

Russia and Its Rulers- Students will be able to evaluate interpretations and produce a focussed thematic essay across the 100 years which will be supported by detailed and accurate knowledge and reach a well-balanced judgement.

Germany- Students will be able to organise, demonstrate and communicate knowledge and understanding to analyse the key features related to the periods studied, making substantiated judgements and exploring concepts such as cause, consequence, change, continuity, similarity, difference and significance

Employability skills:

Information analysis, report writing skills, working to a deadline, understanding large amounts of information and synthesising that.

Year 13 

Curriculum Intention:

The Early Tudors

In the Enquiry element, the focus will be on the critical use of evidence in investigating and assessing historical questions, problems and issues. The link with the Period Study will make it easier for teachers to provide the historical background, context and awareness of how their option is located within the longer term developments of the topic. The focus of the questions may be on depth of one Key topic or breadth, using parts of several key topics for the evaluation of a theme. Each Enquiry topic is of sufficient length to provide a coherent and worthwhile study within the overall period. Each provides a range of perspectives affecting individuals, societies and groups and will enable learners to analyse and evaluate different interpretations and representations of the past through contemporary perspectives. The critical evaluation of sources will be central to this element, with all marks awarded against AO2. The sources selected for examination will be a range of types of written sources, contemporary to the period. Learners will always have to analyse and evaluate four sources, answering one question which sets the sources in their historical context. The complexity of this task thus represents differentiation from AS, where fewer sources are analysed and shorter-answer questions are set. Sources will be fully attributed and only edited for accessibility. Learners’ knowledge of the historical context will only be credited insofar as it is used to analyse and evaluate the sources in relation to the question set.

Democracy and Dictatorships in Germany

This course develops further the second order concepts from GCSE such as cause, consequence and significance of key events and individuals. This unit is taught across the 2 years so that knowledge is not forgotten in Year 13 and it also compliments the Russia and its Rulers Unit as both histories are inter-twinned. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the key historical terms and concepts relevant Germany 1919-63. The will require learners to recall, select and deploy appropriate knowledge and communicate this clearly and effectively. Learners will be expected to demonstrate abilities to explain, assess, analyse and consider the relationships between key features of the period studied in order to reach substantiated judgements.

Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964

This unit is taught across the 2 years so that knowledge and skills are firmly embedded by the end of the 2 years and has been chosen as it complements the Germany Unit 2 option. This course brings together all the skills that have been taught and developed across KS3 and 4 as students will use their skills of analysis to move onto the higher order skill of synthesis and testing a hypothesis and evaluation of secondary interpretations. Stereotypes will be challenged and resources and teaching strategies will reflect and value the diversity of experiences and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of people and communities beyond their immediate experience.

Independent Study

The NEA is completed ideally by the end of Year 12 so as to allow Year 13 to focus on the 3 examined units and prepare for the final exams. This unit builds on the skills being taught across the other 3 examined units and allows the students to showcase their ability to work independently which is valuable preparation for university. Students can immerse themselves in a chosen topic and be exposed to other types of history and civilisations other than those already studied. They will produce a 3,000 to 4,000 word essay.

Curriculum Implementation:

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Sept 2nd - Oct 14th

Independent Study

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Jan 6th – 10th Feb

Independent Study

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

20th April – 18th May

Independent Study

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Half term

Half term

Half term

Oct 28th – Dec 16th

Independent Study

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

24th Feb – 30th March

Independent Study

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

1st June – 13th July

Independent Study

Early Tudors

Germany

Russia and its Rulers

Christmas Holidays

Easter Holidays

Summer Holidays

 

Outcomes:

Tracked by assessed essays, contributions in classes, completion and quality of NEA.

NEA Complete by summer of Year 12 which is a focussed answer and will be supported by detailed and accurate knowledge. Primary sources and secondary interpretations will be analysed and evaluated and used to support the judgements being made.

Russia and Its Rulers- Students will be able to evaluate interpretations and produce a focussed thematic essay across the 100 years which will be supported by detailed and accurate knowledge and reach a well-balanced judgement.

Germany- Students will be able to organise, demonstrate and communicate knowledge and understanding to analyse the key features related to the periods studied, making substantiated judgements and exploring concepts such as cause, consequence, change, continuity, similarity, difference and significance

Employability skills:

Information analysis, report writing skills, working to a deadline, understanding large amounts of information and synthesising that.